Frank Herbert

for discussing authors not listed here, main list or "possibles"

Frank Herbert

Postby Lykins on Saturday, 13 December 2008, 8:06 pm

It seems unlikely that a relatively well known author as Herbert has simply been overlooked, but instead evaluated then rejected. Not finding him on the featured list did spark a certain amount of curiosity in me as to why he was not deemed worthy.
I'll admit I've only ever read the first two of his Dune novels and while I found his prose at times thick and redundant it was, I thought, all in all a highly enjoyable and well-written tale. I still recall sometimes the protagonist at the struggles he faced.
Perhaps because the series received far more recognition than it arguably deserves it has been omitted here.
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Re: Frank Herbert

Postby ImperiumVita on Wednesday, 15 July 2009, 11:37 pm

I must strongly second the inclusion of Frank Herbert's Dune novels, and I'm more than a little surprised and disappointed at finding Dune not only not listed on the site but not listed as a possible future inclusion. After looking over the Author list and seeing the Mary Poppins books (which I haven't read) as well as Tad Williams "Otherland" series of books (which I have) included, I'm certain at least Frank Herbert's original "Dune" itself would be at home on the the page, with at least two works beneath it on a scale of overall Literary quality.

It a reading has somehow been overlooked I strongly urge you to read this book as soon as possible.

http://www.amazon.com/Dune-40th-Anniver ... 400&sr=1-1
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Re: Frank Herbert

Postby DavidTate on Saturday, 18 July 2009, 9:50 am

I was a huge fan of the original novel Dune as a teenager and college student. Going back to it now, even with the aid of nostalgia, the flaws are a bit more obvious. That said, I think it -- just that first book -- stands as a legitimate SF classic. The writing isn't great, and the science is awfully shaky, but the richness of the setting and the thrill of the story make up for a lot. I'd probably say "two stars" on Eric's scale, if that were the only book, but someone with less tolerance for clunky writing could reasonably downgrade it a bit.

The first couple of sequels were tolerable; things went badly downhill from there.

I haven't read any of Herbert's other widely-read books, so I can't speak to the breadth of his work. I'm certainly glad he wrote Dune, but that's about as far as it goes.
David Tate
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Re: Frank Herbert

Postby owlcroft on Sunday, 19 July 2009, 5:15 am

It is my hope that all who visit here will understand the things I labored to elaborate in the Apologia. This is, essentially, one man's subjective opinions on what is good and what is not. Of course, like any human, I feel that my opinions are worthy, that they represent some wonderful and delightful insight into the inner workings of art. But no one need agree with that proposition to find the site of use: they need only find that, in more cases than not, they more or less agree with my selections of estimable works. It is, one might say, a sort of site-wide "if you liked X you will probably like Y" sort of thing.

I was and am, frankly, unexcited by Frank Herbert's work. In early years, I developed a fondness for Dragon in the Sea; on a much later re-reading, I found it hopelessly puerile. Whether Frerb Hankbert[1] is a "mediocre" author is a decision each must make in privacy. Those who have found the authors and works I have included on the site to be worth their reading may decide that Herbert may be left for another day. Those who have already read Herbert and found him estimable are thus better equipped to evaluate the angle at which their tastes and mine may intersect, an evaluation that might eventually lead them to abandon this site as a source of leads for authors or works to investigate.

So be it: it is what it is.


[1] Jack Vance's "Tuckerization" of Frank Herbert.
Cordially,
Eric Walker, webmaster
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